knitwear design submission

Submission: Garter Scarf to Knit Picks

For various and sundry reasons, I haven’t been knitting or designing much lately, but thanks to gentle prompts by my accountability partner I’ve only mostly been neglecting knitting rather than completely neglecting it.

Part of that neglect has been ignoring all the recent calls for submissions, but on Valentine’s Day, I looked at two calls that Knit Picks put out a few weeks ago. One was for items that take less than 200 grams of yarn, the other for garter stitch items.

Since the deadline was the next day and I wasn’t sure I could come up with one idea, never mind two, and since I’m always all about doing the easiest thing and with garter stitch you knit every row, I started knitting every row.

Garter stitch isn’t the most exciting stitch on the books, and it always manages to scream “new knitter,” but it seems like the knitting world is in love with it all of a sudden.

From the call:

“Celebrate it with garments and accessories in weights from fingering to super bulky and a neutral palette with pops of color. Garter stitch is the main point of interest, and clever, engaging construction is a must! Bonus points for unusual shapes or if the project is knit entirely in garter.”

I found a lot of that to be oxymoronic as it applies to garter stitch, but I gave it a shot.

I tried this and that, which is hard to do when you can’t even purl, and nothing was happening for a couple of hours. But then I added a second color and a little bit of magic, and blimey, I had something that looked like checks on one side and stripes on the other. And it had clever, engaging construction and pops of color, and was knit entirely in garter. And it hardly even looked like garter stitch (read: not ugly).

The next day, Monday, deadline day, I knit up a swatch using colors from the call, wrote up the proposal, and sent ‘er in.

Knit Picks doesn’t drag their feet when it comes to decisions so I’ll get a yay or nay on Friday. Send up some prayers for me, yeah?

To Ponder: When the solution is simple, God is answering. |-Albert Einstein-|

Decision: Tee by Louet

I have a lace-and-ribbing tee in my submission queue that I really love. It started as the Padre Island Tee when I submitted it to Knit Picks and Knitscene. Then it was called Island Tee when PomPom Quarterly rejected it.

And when I submitted it to the yarn company Louet in mid-July, I called it Long Island Tee.* The call said they were looking for tees, for lace, and for designs that use 2–6 skeins of yarn. It’s not often that an existing design hits a trifecta, but it is often that I’m rejected.

However…

Whether because of the name change or that this design’s time has finally come:

LOUET WANTS MY LONG ISLAND TEE FOR SPRING 2016!

I proposed it their Gems Sport yarn, a 100% merino wool. Admittedly a ridiculous fiber for a spring garment in central Texas, but I have to remember that a significant population of the world doesn’t start wearing shorts and flip-flops** in March, and may still appreciate the warmth of wool.

But when they accepted it, the editor asked me to use their Euroflax Sport, a 100% linen yarn. I agreed, partly because this design could be knit out of anything, even kitchen twine, but mostly because who am I to demand no brown M&Ms in my dressing room?

The yarn arrived yesterday.

Swatching begins today.

George Gently began last night.


*Thanks to my accountability partner, Melinda, for the joke that polished into a jewel.

**Not me. Not flip-flops. Not ever.

To Ponder: The person who says something is impossible should not interrupt the person who is doing it. |-Chinese Proverb-|

Submission: Sweater to Green Mountain Spinnery

Green Mountain Spinnery is a small, sustainable family-owned yarn company located in one of the states my alter (richer) ego has dreamed of living—Vermont.

They put out a call for submissions for sweater designs using their Mountain Mohair yarn. It’s a mostly wool blend yarn with 30% mohair “sourced from Angora Goats from various herds across the country from Vermont to Texas.” And it has cool color names like Alpenglo, Blue Gentian, Edelweiss, and Vincent’s Gold.

Being that my Icelandic sweater design would be perfect for this yarn, and being that it was available for submission, I sent it in—a full 11 days ahead of the deadline.

Wrong side out to preserve secrecy.

While the stranded yoke would look good in just about any three of Green Mountain Spinnery’s colors, I proposed ones similar to the swatch because a) that color combo works, and b) you never know about another person’s ability to envision.

Beautiful subtleties in each color.

They notify in three weeks from the submission deadline, so please send up prayers for good news on June 12th.

To Ponder: If you find something that feels right but doesn’t seem to fit into your master plan, take a chance, and commit to it by working hard. You shouldn’t be afraid to let passion get behind the wheel.You might really love where you end up. |-Jerry Yang-|

Submission: Hat and Sweater to Knitscene

Last month was the deadline for Knitscene’s Spring 2016 issue.

They had only two stories:

Checks and Balances – Gingham, checks, and plaids. Imagine ways to work with the season’s most popular fabric in texture and color for simple but fun garments and accessories.

Retro Fashion – Sweet details make the difference in retro-inspired knitwear. We’re seeking garments and accessories that could have come from the 1940s or 1950s—or have been inspired by those classic looks.

I ignored the first one because plaids usually involves the intarsia knitting technique, which makes my eyeballs itch.

The second one for retro-inspired knitwear, however, could be done. I threw myself into the briar patch of Pinterest, researching looks for both decades, and found a 50s dress design by Anne Fogarty that could be translated into a sweater.

Fabulous photo, too.

Knitscene hasn’t followed in their sister magazine‘s footsteps and switched to online proposals, so I mailed a swatch for the sweater and also sent them a hat with a design that could be from any era.

Wish me luck, eh?

To Ponder: Successful people form the habit of doing what failures don’t like to do. They like the results they get by doing what they don’t necessarily enjoy. |-Earl Nightingale-|

Submission: Hats to Knit Picks

Magazines and yarn companies are thinking about next spring, which means that I am thinking about next spring.

Knit Picks put out a call for submissions for their Spring 2016 Stashbusting collection. From the call:

Small, cute, fun and quick to knit, these projects are purposefully made with stashbusting in mind! Colorwork, pom-poms, stripes, and colorblocking are perfect ways to use up those last few bits of yarn to make something warm and cozy. Clever and whimsical details make these projects must knit. The collection will be divided by weight into sections featuring 50g, 100g, and 150g of yarn.

I had the perfect thing for them. When designing the Icelandic sweater I submitted to Interweave Knits a couple of weeks ago, I had taken a day trip into Norwegian territory. I used a hat to test the design, and it looked pretty good, so I knit a couple more hats to tweak the particulars.

A hat called Norge.

I submitted that hat a week early, and since I was flush with extra time, I worked on another hat design, this one using a cable that didn’t make the final cut for The Sweater.

I spent quite a few hours perfecting, what else?—the crown decreases. And I have three more hats to sell at the farmer’s market next fall.

And please don’t worry that my position as a procrastination super star is in jeopardy. I submitted the hat very late the night of the deadline.

A hat called Othello.

A hat called Othello.

Knit Picks sends out yays and nays by this Friday, so won’t you please send up prayers that they both earn a yay?

To Ponder: I am telling you to make a choice based on your passions and interests, not what everyone else is telling you to do. It doesn’t work that way. You wind up living a life for the wrong reasons, and you never get the most out of it. Just always think about why you are doing what you are doing. |-Jeff Hoffman-|

Submission: Sweaters to Interweave Knits

Yesterday was the deadline for Interweave Knits Winter 2016 issue.

From the call for submissions:

For the Winter issue, we want to see traditional, iconic sweaters. That is the theme. Give us your best Arans, Fair Isle pullovers, ganseys, Nordic ski sweaters, Icelandic yokes, Bohus yokes, and more.

I’ve been hankering for a big colorwork design, so I started a new one from scratch. I had the idea for an Icelandic pullover, but it turned into a Norwegian sort of design, which I then rolled back over to Icelandic.

I was specifically designing the lopapeysa style of Icelandic sweater, which has long jaggedy graphics in the yoke. The Norwegian graphics are smaller and tighter, and tend toward snowflake-type motifs.

How about a picture?

Worth 1,000 words.

My design uses three colors, sometimes in the same row, which, I tell you, was quite the challenge until I got the hang of it. It wasn’t the knitting so much as the stranding, and just to make sure I could do it, I knit a full-size yoke.

Wrong side showing some decent stranding, if I do say so.

Interweave Knits has changed their submission process, having you email a proposal with photos rather than the actual swatch, which has sent this procrastinator over the moon.

So, I submitted my Icelandic sweater.

And then I did something really dumb gutsy and submitted The Sweater. (Knitscene didn’t want it.)

I’m not sure I want IK to accept both sweaters* as I would have to finish designing and then knit two major projects on deadline.


*Just kidding. Of course I want to have two designs in the same issue of Interweave Knits. Please send up good thoughts and prayers.

To Ponder: We all start off looking for love, attention…to achieve in music, make a contribution, make a million bucks. These are all great and honorable things. They’re great. But while you’re working for them, you have to set your own goals to work your ass off. All the time. Every time. |-David Lee Roth-|

Diamond Dave workin’ it.

 

Submission: Fingerless Mitts to Knitty

It’s way past the acceptance deadline for some fingerless mitts I submitted to Interweave Knits (which I didn’t blog about), so I submitted them to Knitty.

I usually take my own photos in my backyard, but Knitty would be publishing these photos, so they had to be good and interesting.

These mitts have a 1950s Atomic Era feel to them, and my sweet friend Angie just so happens to have Atomic-inspired home décor, so I took my camera and tripod over to her house last week and we got to work.*

I can’t show you the mitts, but I can show you parts of our fun photo shoot.

We started out in her kitchen, looking for creative ways to display the mitts.

Grabbing a pack of Dan Dare cards from a shelf.

Pouring nothing into a shot glass.

Then we moved outside where the light was better, and where her two dogs totally behaved themselves and didn’t try to sneak into the frame even once.**

A cool drink of blue food coloring with Live Oaks and paper towels in the background.

All the blood rushing to my head.

After I checked and rechecked my pattern, charts, and photos, and made sure I didn’t miss anything***, I uploaded my submission package—a week early!

I think this is my 527th submission to them, so please send up 527 prayers and good thoughts that this is my first acceptance.


*After we drank some coffee while she cleaned her kitchen.

**Not even the littlest bit true.

***I forgot to include my headshot. Grr.

To Ponder: Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time. |-Thomas Edison-|

Submission: Vest and Pillow to Knit Now

Knit Now is a knit and crochet magazine out of the UK. The magazine cover has a sort of Woman’s World vibe, but the patterns are cute.

These covers sell a lot of magazines.

Unlike most knitting magazines that publish quarterly with a special issue here and there, Knit Now publishes monthly, so their call for submissions is for three months’ worth. And also unlike most knitting magazines, they regularly publish patterns for babies and homewares along with women’s garments and accessories.

They put out an interesting call for their Summer 2015 issues, and by interesting, I mean that I already had a couple of things that would fit the call and I didn’t have to do any real work.

From the call:

City Chic – Relaxed garments and simple accessories are the order of the day. Concentrate on stylish pieces which would be just as home in the office as on the street.

Tempting Textures – This collection is all about creating tactile knits that you’ll love to wear. I want to see stitch patterns that just scream “touch me!”

Allotment Knits – This month we’re digging over the allotment. Will the structure of paths and potting sheds, trugs* and trellis tame the abundant fruit and veg? Add a touch of whimsy** with uninvited guests.***

So, I spent Game Day submitting my Welligkeit Vest (a.k.a. Adelante Tank and Petal Tank), that was previously rejected by Knitscene, Twist Collective, and knit.wear.

Just a photo that shows nothing.

I also submitted my Brookshire Pillow that Knitscene didn’t want.

A picture that shows a little more than nothing.

Because this is a British publication, I was extra careful to include both inches and centimeters for all measurements.

Their deadline is February 18th before 6:00 GMT, and since I’m too lazy to figure out exactly when that is, I submitted my proposals 17 days early.

They notify within a week of the deadline, so please send out good thoughts and prayers that at least one of my patterns will be published across the pond.


*From all the British TV shows I watch, I knew what an allotment was—a plot of land rented out to individual gardeners—but I had to look up trug. It’s “a shallow basket for carrying flowers, vegetables, etc., made from strips of wood.”

**What’s with the whimsy all of a sudden? Knit Picks was on about that too.

***Uninvited guests could mean anything from scorpions and centipedes to most of my family, so I just stayed away from that.

To Ponder: You just need to have a love for what you’re doing. It’s not about thinking that it’s the cool thing; it’s about really believing in it. |-Anna Wintour-|

Submission: Kerchief Thing to Holla Knits

Yesterday—a full day before the deadline*, thank you—I submitted a proposal to Holla Knits for their Warm Weather Accessories collection.

From the call:

As always, I’m looking for risky, unique knits you won’t see in print knitting pattern magazines. Make a bold color choice. Chose a challenging stitch pattern. Use those advanced knitting skills and produce a show stopping knit you want to wear or use every time you leave the house.

I submitted that kerchief thing that Interweave Knits rejected a few months ago.

Just a peek.

As far as I could determine, nothing like this exists in the knitting world, so it might just be unique enough (and challenging with all those bobbles) to be one of the six items they’re going to publish in this collection.

Send up prayers and good thoughts for me, would you?

*The editor prefers a physical swatch via snailmail, but will accept an emailed proposal with photos, which is good because I kept snoozing the online calendar notification until it was too late to mail it.

To Ponder: Study while others are sleeping; work while others are loafing; prepare while others are playing; and dream while others are wishing. |-William Arthur Ward-|

Submission: The Sweater to Knitscene

No, The Sweater isn’t finished, but it’s close enough to make me confident that I can finish it for Knitscene if they want it.

This is for their Winter 2015 issue, and their call had a very simple description:

That first nip of cold weather is a signal to knitters everywhere to break out the woolens and warm layers. We’re seeking submissions for our Winter Essentials collection—perfect items to knit for women and men that play on the traditional winter wardrobe staples. Use texture, color, and clever twists on basic silhouettes in must-knit garment and accessory designs.

There’s no specific colorwork or cable or style icon story, so it seems like anything goes.

Knitscene is part of Interweave Press, so they want you to send an actual knitted swatch via snail mail. I thought I was going to submit something else, but that didn’t come together in time, which means that by the time I decided to submit The Sweater, it was almost the last minute.

My sweater is probably a wee bit advanced for Knitscene’s target knitters, which are beginner to intermediate, but they’ve published a few challenging patterns:

Skill builders.                                                                                                |Photos (c)Knitscene|

If you must know, I almost didn’t submit this sweater for the silliest reason. If they accept your proposal, they keep the swatch, presumably to compare it to your finished item to make sure you didn’t pull a switcheroo. I had knit a serious swatch for this sweater, and, well, I wanted to keep it.*

A new take on a traditional staple.

But Knitscene can’t accept what I don’t send, so I packaged it up and mailed it off.

*I told you it was a silly reason.

To Ponder: A successful individual typically sets his next goal somewhat but not too much above his last achievement. |-Kurt Lewin-|